restless dreams


i like rilakkuma, coffee, rainy days, dexter, green tea, music, johnny depp and when all the others were just stirring awake i'm trying to trick myself to fall asleep again.

unamusedsloth:

The items practically sell themselves.

(via lemon-cream)


Six-Word Stories That Are Absolutely Heart-Breaking

(Source: beben-eleben, via queencersei)

lordbape:

Beth & Herbert Levine “Barefoot in the Grass” Sandals 1968

lordbape:

Beth & Herbert Levine “Barefoot in the Grass” Sandals 1968

(via fiebre)


archiemcphee:

We hope you’re thirsty for some more amazing 3D coffee art. These exceptionally frothy works of art art the work of Yuuichi Ito, who works at Belcorno, an Italian restaurant in Aichi Prefecture, Japan.

Head over to RocketNews24 to check out more of Mr. Ito’s kawaii and colorful coffee art.

[via RocketNews24 and Kotaku]

(via lemon-cream)


stories-yet-to-be-written:

The Best Pictures Of This Year’s Japanese Cherry Blossoms

The Japanese cherry blossom, known as the Sakura in Japanese, is the flower of a cherry tree that is cultivated for its decorative features rather than for cherries (it doesn’t bear fruit). The overwhelming beauty of the cherry blossom bloom has been known and adored for ages. The blooming period is associated with Japanese traditions, culture, aesthetics, and is a bittersweet metaphor for the ephemeral nature of life itself.

The blooming cherry blossoms herald the beginning of the centuries-old Hanami festival – the traditional Japanese custom of picnicking under trees rich with flowering Sakura branches and enjoying this short but striking first breath of spring. The blossoming wave usually starts in Okinawa in January or February and progresses through all of Japan until April or May. The cherry blossom front (Sakura zensen) can be conveniently tracked every year using this calendar.

Source: Demilked Magazine

(via usotsukii)

fortswinwars:

"Shrouded within the park of Villa Demidoff (just north of Florence, Italy), there sits a gigantic 16th century sculpture known as Colosso dell’Appennino, or the Appennine Colossus. The brooding structure was first erected in 1580 by Italian sculptor Giambologna. Like a guardian of the pond in front of him, the giant is in an endless watchful pose, perched atop his earthy seat.”

fortswinwars:

"Shrouded within the park of Villa Demidoff (just north of Florence, Italy), there sits a gigantic 16th century sculpture known as Colosso dell’Appennino, or the Appennine Colossus. The brooding structure was first erected in 1580 by Italian sculptor Giambologna. Like a guardian of the pond in front of him, the giant is in an endless watchful pose, perched atop his earthy seat.”

(Source: mymodernmet.com, via fiebre)


sosuperawesome:

Cardboard lamps by Vera van Wolferen on Tumblr

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